Wrigley Field reveals expanded dugouts and concourse

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The results of the second-to-last phase of Wrigley’s five-year, US$750m makeover have been unveiled.

The visitors’ and home dugouts at the home of the Chicago Cubs, which are slightly different sizes, have been moved 25-30ft (8-9m) down the lines and widened by between 7.5ft and 12ft (3-4m).

More headroom has been created by digging a deeper well. A second bench has been added, elevated to field level – this puts players at eye level with the action without them needing to stand up.

No seats for fans were removed to make room for the larger dugouts, although some seats by the home dugout have been reinstalled on metal brackets instead of concrete. This means that the seats and dugout can be removed to configure the field for football games. The club also excavated under the stadium to add a weight room and batting tunnel.

A number of other changes will be rolled out ahead of opening day. A partnership with Xfinity gives fans access to improved wi-fi in certain areas of the ground, and there are plans to extend this service inside the ballpark and neighboring campus during the season.

A number of mobile food stations originally on the ground-level concourse have been removed entirely, or moved to areas where they will be less in the way.

The renovated Wrigley will also have more grills and other areas where fresh food can be prepared at the stadium rather than it be trucked in. Next year, the Major League Baseball club plans to add more concession options in the upper decks.

Next off-season represents the final phase of the 1060 Project, a US$1bn restoration of Wrigley Field and the area just outside the stadium.

April 18, 2018

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As editor of four magazines at UKi Media & Events James brings over a decade of writing about, and obsessing over, technology and cars to Automotive Interiors World, Stadia, Winter Sports Technology International and Auditoria. Responsible for commissioning, writing and editing each issue he’s covered the best (and worst) from around the industry on a continual search to feature the latest innovation or talking point on the next cover.

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